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  • Siiri

Letters from S: May 2022 – A Selection of Springtime Poems

Dearest reader,


I freely admit that I don't know a lot about poetry or poets but when I do discover a delightful set of phrases I savor their simply put yet intricate beauty and take comfort in knowing that somebody felt the same way and had the genius to capture the fleeting moment, memory or a feeling. And, naturally, if the set of phrases is incredibly joyous I add it to my Pinterest board.


As a matter of fact and in my humble opinion, spring is an exceptionally poetic time of the year that seems to wake the poet even in the most discreet of natures. The end of May, at least in northern hemisphere, was surely when the lyrical souls of humankind sat down to put on paper the matters of heart, nature and senses. And would it be any wonder, when the world is all of a sudden so colorful, scented and loud?


Therefore, in the spirit of springtime poets, I want to share some of my favorite spring appropriate poems which I discovered on Pinterest to make this last week of spring especially memorable. Hopefully, they will take you into summer with happy and uplifted moods!


A SELECTION OF SPRINGTIME POEMS:



Spring Poem 1

(View on Pinterest)


To see the world in a grain of sand

And a heaven in a wild flower,

Hold infinity in the palm of your hand

And eternity in an hour.


– William Blake


 

Spring Poem 2

(Read the full poem here)


"Hope" is a thing with feathers

That perches in the soul,

And sings the tune without the words,

And never stops at all


– Emily Dickinson


 

Spring Poem 3

(View on Pinterest)


Doubt thou that the starts are fire;

Doubt thou that the sun doth move;

Doubt truth to be a liar;

But never doubt I love.


– William Shakespeare, Hamlet


 

Spring Poem 4

(Read the full poem here)


A host of golden daffodils,

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.


– William Wordswhorth


 

Spring Poem 5

(View on Pinterest)


If I can stop one heart

From breaking,

I shall not live in vain;


If I can ease one life the aching,

Or cool one pain,


Or help one fainting robin

Unto his nest again,


I shall not live in vain.


– Emily Dickinson


 


Outfit Notes:

The tartan skirt is 1970s vintage | The blazer is made by me and my mother | Th bag is 1980s vintage from my great grandmother | The white Part Two Copenhagen blouse is secondhand


 


Which poem was your favorite?

Do you collect poems?

Would you like me to do a summer poem edition?


 

Yours truly,


Siiri

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